Literary Loch Lomond and the Trossachs: 15. Loch Katrine I

 

Inversnaid to the Trossachs

From Inversnaid retrace your steps to Stronachlachar. Pedestrians can follow the old military road. The next part of the journey can be made either by the ‘Sir Walter Scott’, or by cycle by the head of Loch Katrine to Trossachs Pier. Cars must return to Aberfoyle, and cross the Duke’s Pass to reach The Trossachs. Scottish Water  maintains the ‘Sir Walter Scott’ on Loch Katrine. In the mornings nowadays it plies between the Trossachs Pier and Stronachlachar, where it may be boarded for the return journey. Round trips from Stronachlachar involve an overnight stay! In the afternoons the vessel makes a round trip without calling at Stonachlachar. This remarkable steamship was built in 1900. It is coal fired; oil being regarded as pernicious by the Water Board. It is the oldest vessel of its kind afloat. The excursion is the best way for the motorist or the pedestrian to see the loch.

From Stronachlachar it is a short walk to Wordsworth’s Point. It follows the private road to Glen Gyle. Beyond the houses it circumvents a charming bay and reaches a promontary from which most of the upper part of the Loch can be seen. Across the loch there is a view of ‘Rob Roy’s Grave’ where Wordsworth, mistakenly, thought the outlaw was buried, and Glen Gyle, his birthplace. A longer walk leads by the head of the loch past the house to the graveyard and back. There are fine views of Glen Gyle dominated by Ben Ducteath; attractive waterfalls, if it has been wet; and of the upper part of Loch Katrine which is much more attractive than generally allowed. There is also fine circular walk from Stronachlachar following the old  road by the head of Loch Arklet with its dramatic views of the Arrochar Alps, to the head of Loch Chon. Thence a track, climbing into the corrie which Patrick Graham suggested was haunted by fairies, follows the aqueduct to Royal Cottage on Loch Katrine. A Water Board road leads back to Stronachlachar.

 

Stronachlachar

There has been a well-established landing point at Stronachlachar, stonemason’s point, on Loch Katrine, or thereabouts, for more than two hundred and fifty years. Many distinguished visitors have passed that way, and, as already referred to, cursed it for one reason and another. Like all places which enjoy something of a monopoly the incomer’s sense of exploitation is strong. The Hotel is now closed, used by the Regional Council and the Glasgow Corporation before them. A reading of the bye-laws is not recommended: it appears that one is allowed to be there, but one is prohibited from doing anything. Dumps of human excrement, for example, are expressly forbidden. The raising of the level of the loch means that the water is very deep, and the little island offshore, Rob Roy’s Prison (or the Factor’s Island or Eilean Dearg [Red Island]) which is seen close at hand, has a fortified look to prevent it from being washed away.

At Stronachlachar the hills on the opposite side of the loch are unimpressive, although a fine peak, Stob a Choin, the dog’s fang, is hidden behind them. The head of the loch is hidden too, but it is not a long walk to a headland from which Glen Gyle can be seen. Across the loch are Glengyle House, Rob Roy’s birthplace, and Portnellan, the first house which he occupied when he was married, and just below which is the graveyard which (erroneously) inspired Wordsworth’s poem,’Rob Roy’s Grave’. The site of the Ferryman’s Hut where the Wordsworth’s stayed is Coilachra, opposite Stronachlachar.

The head of Loch Katrine is Rob Roy MacGregor’s native place, and many writers give some account of him. The best biography is by W.H.Murray (1913-96) , the Scottish writer and mountaineer, who describes his life with historical authenticity, whereas most descriptions including, of course, Sir Walter Scott’s novel, owe much to the imagination. Murray’s description of the ‘Rob Roy Country’ is as follows:

The Trossachs for all its nearness to Glasgow remained for Lowlanders a mountainous backdrop, a foreign land where no English was spoken, to be approached by the venturesome only for business reasons – men like the factors from the fringing estates of Menteith, Atholl or Breadalbane, itinerant pedlars, tailors and cobblers, stocking makers, gypsies, iron smelters and their foresters officers on reconnaissance or soldiers on duty. And these knew only the main glens.

Glen Gyle, where Rob was born and bred was one of the least accessible valleys in all that country. The flanking hills rose to 2500 feet, but the Parlan Pass, just a thousand feet above his house gave a route of only five miles to Glen Falloch, where at Inverarnan was the night stance, or resting place, for cattle herds driven from Argull to the autumn tryst at Crieff. Smaller herds bound for the markets at Doune, Stirling, or Edinburgh and so by Loch Katrine’s head to Aberfoyle. Seasonal traffic thus passed through the glens which, although now deserted, were intensively cultivated.

W.H.Murray Rob Roy MacGregor 1982

Murray goes on to describe how the houses belonging to the two MacGregor families in the glen got their names – the black house (Tigh Dubh [The Dow or Dhu]), on the dark southern side of the loch with unmortared walls, and the white house (Tigh Geal [or Gyle]), where Rob Roy was born.

A notable description of the country, and of the activities of the MacGregors, in particular of Rob Roy’s nephew ‘Black Knee’ Macgregor of Glengyle who was the chief of the Sept, is given in the document already quoted from by Nichol Graham of Gartmore, An Inquiry into the Causes which facilitate the Rise and Progress of Rebellions and Insurrections in the Highlands of Scotland 1747:

The lands at the head of the Parish of Buchanan lying betwixt Loch Lomond and Loch Katrine, are, of all these in that country, the best adapted for concealments, and the most conveniently situated for bad purposes, and they had formerly been possessed by those of that clan. Thefts and depradations were pushed successfully in these places, with an intention, either to turn these lands waste, or oblige that lord the proprietor of them then, by a purchase from the family of Buchanan, to grant leases to those ancient possessors. The scheme purported answered: the sons of Rob Roy got one half of those lands in lease, and Glengyle, the nephew, the other. When these people got possession of these places so well fitted for their designs, they found they were able to carry matters still one point further; in order to which it was necessary that the thefts and depredations should be carried on incessantly through their whole neighbourhood. Things being thus prepared that this MacGregor of Glengyle should keep a Highland watch for protecting that country from these mischiefs, for supporting which he demanded £4 Scots out of each £100 Scots of valued rent. As they had now got possession of these high grounds in a legal way, from whence they could vex the whole neighbourhood, the thing was agreed and a formal blackmail contract entered into between MacGregor and a great many heritors, whose lands lay chiefly exposed to these depredations, and which enabled him, when the troubles of 1745 began, to raise about forty men for that service, with which this same man put the country upon the Water of Endrick, Dundas, Strathblane, and other places, undercontributions, and opened the first scene in that fatal tragedy, by surprising the Barracks of Inversaid, and part of General Campbell’s regiment, which was working at the Inverary roads.

Graham explains blackmail in the following amusing way, although, of course, it was not amusing at the time:

A person who had the greatest correspondence with the thieves was agreed upon to preserve the lands contracted for from thefts, for certain sums to be paid yearly out of these lands. Upon this fund he employed one half of the thieves to recover stolen cattle, and the other half of them to steal, in order to make this agreement and blackmail contract necessary.

Blackmail, a term which originated in this way, was so-called because of the black sheep involved. The ‘Black Watch’ gave the name to the famous regiment. When the Wordsworths stayed at Glen Gyle they were regaled with tales of the famous freebooter:

We mentioned Rob Roy, and the eyes of all glistened; even the lady of the house, who was very diffident, and no great talker, exclaimed, “He was a good man Rob Roy!” He had been dead only about eighty years, had lived in the next farm, which belonged to him, and there his bones were laid. He was a famous swordsman. Having an arm much longer than other men, he had a greater command with his sword. As proof of his length of arm they told us that he could garter his tartan stockings below his knee without stooping, and added about a dozen diffferent stories of single combats, which he had fought, all in perfect good humour, merely to prove his prowess. I daresay they had stories of this kind which would hardly have been exhausted in the long evenings of a whole December week, Rob Roy being as famous here as ever Robin Hood was in the Forest of Sherwood; he also robbed from the rich, giving to the poor and defending them from oppression. They tell of his confining the factor of the Duke of Montrose in one of the islands of Loch Kathrine, after having taken his money from him – the Duke’s rents – in open day while they were sitting at table. He was a formidable enemy of the Duke, but being a small laird against the greater, was overcome at last, and forced to resign all his lands on the braes of Loch Lomond, including the caves which we visited, on account of the money he had taken from the Duke and could not repay.

Dorothy Wordsworth Journal  

Murray points out that the Wordsworths, and countless others since, were, in the tale about the way Rob tied his garters, victims of the Highland habit of gentle exaggeration of this kind as a figure of speech. It is amusing to contrast Coleridge’s account of their trip with Dorothy Wordsworth’s. He was out of sorts, and complains a good deal, but he was quite impressed with the head of Loch Katrine whereas Dorothy Wordsworth most decidedly was not:

A fine body of water in an elbow bend, but the mountains were all too dreary and not very impressive in their forms and combinations. There was wood on them but a total want of cultivated land and happy cottages. This first reach of the lake, perhaps two miles in length has four islands, sweet bays and island-like promontories, one shaped like a dolphin and another like a sea-lion.

S.T.Coleridge Notebooks

James Hogg had passed that way earlier in the same year (May 1803). He recalled another journey that he had made in 1791:

I had twelve years ago been sent on an errand to the house of Glengyle, to ask permission of MacGregor, the laird, to go through his land with a drove of sheep. he was then an old man, and seemed to me to be a very queer man; but his lady granted nmy request without hesitation, and seemed to me an active social woman. theefore I expected from the idea that I had formed of her character, to be very welcome there, and never knew, until I went to the house, that the laird was dead, and the lady and her family removed to the neighbourhood of Callander; while the farm and mansion-house were posessed by two farmers. When I called one of them came to the door. I asked the favour of a night’s lodging: but the important McFarlane made use of that decicive moment to ask me half a score of questions before he desired me to walk in. McAlpin, the other farmer, I found to be a very considerable man, both in abilities and influence, but the most warm and violent man in dispute.

Hogg goes on to relate how McAlpin had once refused to accommodate five Glasgow gentlemen.

There is nothing about Glengyle that admits of particular description. it is situated at the head of Loch Katrine and surrounded by black rocks. It was one of Rob Roy’s principal haunts, to whom Glengyle was related. McAlpin showed me the island in Loch Katrine where he confined the Duke of Montrose’s steward, ofter robbing him of his master’s rents and where he nearly famished him. The MacGregors have a burial place at Glengyle, surrounded by a high wall. On one of their monuments their coat of arms and motto are engraved.

James Hogg Highland Tours      

The Ettrick Shepherd set a ballad about the Macgregors in Glen Gyle. It begins as follows:

MacGregor, MacGregor, remember our foemen:
The moon rises high on the brow of Ben Lomond:
The clans are impatient, and chide thy delay:
Arise! let us bound to Glen Lyon away

James Hogg The Fate of MacGregor

The Wordsworths and Coleridge encountered the same cautious civility at Glengyle as had Hogg. What is surprising here is the way that both the Border Poet and the three ‘Lake Poets’, all four of them sassenachs, seemed to expect the Highlanders to throw open their houses to them without question. Wordsworth went up to the door:

He addressed himself to one who appeared like the master, and all drew near him, staring at William as nobody could have but out of sheer rudeness, except in such a lonely place. He told his tale, and inquired about boats; there were no boats and no lodging nearer than Callander, ten miles beyond the foot of the lake. A laugh was on every face when William said we were come to see the Trossachs; no doubt they thought we had better stayed in our own homes. William endeavoured to make it appear not so foolish, by informing them that it was a place much celebrated in England, though perhaps little thought of by them, and that we only differed from many of our countrymen in having come the wrong way in consequence of an erroneous direction.

Dorothy Wordsworth Journal

In fact they were hospitably received by the McAlpins and the MacFarlanes and the Journal gives a substantial account of the condition of a house occupied by gentlemen-farmers in those days. They were misinformed about Rob Roy’s Grave here, as well as by the ferryman at Coilachra, Gregor MacGregor, to whom they were directed the following morning.
There is a substantial account of Glengyle in Alasdair Alpin MacGregor Wild Drumalbain, or the Road to Meggernie and Glencoe (1927). His kinsfolk lived there. The contemporary author John Barrington lived in Glen Gyle. He ws a mountain shepherd, and gives this account of Coilachra:

My duties begin at the east end of the Barn Park, just above the so-called Hanging Tree, a tall solitary Scots Pine which stands tall amongst the birch, hazel and alder. A prince among beggars. Next to the tree are the ruins of a small house where Dorothy and William Wordsworth, in company with their friend Sam Coleridge, embarked to cross Katrine’s clear water. The party spent the previous evening, in that summer of 1803, at Glengyle House and had been, of course, hospitably entertained. The three travellers were deeply impressed by their experiences and it was here that William found both his ‘Sweet Highland Girl’ and ‘Solitary Reaper’

John Barrington Red Sky at Night            

These two poems, which are often confused with one another, by others, because their subject matter seems as if it might be the same, are connected, respectively, with Inversnaid and Loch Voil.

Another, rather remote, literary connection with Rob Roy is provided by John Buchan (1875-1940) who makes Dickson McCunn, the hero of Huntingtower a descendant of a daughter of Bailie Nichol Jarvie and ‘like the Bailie he can count kin, should he wish with Rob Roy himself.’ In Kidnapped, Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-94) takes Alan Breck Stewart and David Balfour to Balquhidder where they encounter Robin Oig, ‘one of the sons of the notorious Rob Roy’

He was sought upon all sides on a charge of carrying a young woman from Balfron and marrying her (as was alleged) by force; yet he stepped about Balquidder like a gentleman in his own walled policy. It was he who had shot James Maclaren at the plough stilts, a quarrel never satisfied; yet he walked into the house of his blood enemies as a rider (commercial traveller) might into a public inn.

A highly passable latterday imitation of Stevenson is provided by Nigel Tranter (1909-2000) whose contemporary historical novels, set in Scotland, have a considerable following. Tranter’s major achievement is his updating of The Queen’s Scotland in which, single-handed, he gave us a thumb-nail sketch of our heritage, derivative of course, but deserving to rank alongside the Statistical Accounts as documents of their time. His MacGregor Trilogy (1957) is partly set in the Trossachs and features Rob Roy, his nephew Ghlun Dhu Macgregor and other local characters. There is much evocative scene-setting in the novels, as might be expected from an author whose familiarity with ground is matched by his ability to describe it. He describes a crossing on foot by Ghlun Dhu from Inversnaid to Glen Gyle:

Here was a very different valley from that of Inversnaid, a true glen, deep and narrow, between soaring rugged peaks, through which raced a sizeable river in rushes and falls and linked gleaming pools. It was a place of scattered open birch-woods and hazel- fringed water-meadows, of great outcropping rocks as big as house, and long sweeping grassy aprons scored by burnlets innumerable. Five miles it stretched, all seen clearly from up here, from the head of fair Loch Katrine at its foot, to where the thrusting shoulder of a mountain divided it neatly into two,upper corries that rose fully five hundred feet above its floor, where the twin headwaters were born. and the whole was dotted with croft-houses with their patches of tilth and their peat-stacks, and cattles grazed high on the hills. Down near the loch shore Gregor’s own house of Glengyle stood amidst amidst its sheltering trees, surrounded by its orchard, its herb garden, its steading and offices, its smiddy and its tannery and its duck-pond, like a hen amongst her brood.

Tranter goes on to describe Glen Gyle House:

Glen Gyle House was a much superior place to Rob Roy’s fairly recently built establishment at Inversnaid, three stories high, narrow, whitewashed, with a steep crow-step gabled roof, stone-slated not reed thatched, however much moss-grown. Moreover it has stair-tower attached, wherein was the handsome moulded doorway surmounted by a weather-worn heraldic stone panel, showing, even though dimly, the crossed tree and sword of his race – bearing suitably the crown on top of the sword – and the motto S’rioghal mo Dhream, ‘My Race is Royal.’

Nigel Tranter MacGregor’s Gathering 1957

Glen Gyle inspired a poem, Rob Roy’s Grave, which is well enough known, and has some memorable lines, but which illustrates what a hit and miss affair poetry is. On the first occasion that they visit Glengyle the Wordsworths and Coleridge are tired, and doubtful about whether they are going to get a night’s lodging. It was on a later occasion, that of their memorable walk from Glen Falloch to Glen Gyle, that Dorothy quotes Rob Roy’s Grave, although Wordsworth composed all his Scottish poems at a later date:

We passed the same farm-house we had such good reason to remember, and went up to the burying ground that stood so sweetly at the waterside. The ferryman had told us that Rob Roy’s grave was there, so we could not pass on without going to the spot. there were several tombstones, but the inscriptions were either worn out or unintelligible to us, and the place was choked up with nettles and brambles. You will remember the description I have given of the spot. I have nothing here to add, except the following poem which it suggested to William:

ROB ROY’S GRAVE

A famous man is Robin Hood,
The English ballad-singer’s joy,
And Scotland boasts of one as good,
She has her own Rob Roy!

Then clear the weeds from off his grave,
And let us chaunt a passing stave
In honour of that outlaw brave.

Heaven gave Rob Roy a daring heart
And wondrous length and strength of arm,
Nor craved he more to quell his foes,
Or keep his friends from harm.

Yet Robin was as wise as brave,
As wise in thought as bold in deed,
For in the principles of things
He sought his moral creed.

Said generous Rob, “What need of books?
Burn all the statues and their shelves:
they stir us up against our kind,
And worse against ourselves.

“We have a passion; make a law,
Too false to guide us or control:
And for the law itself we fight
In bitterness of soul.

“And puzzled, blinded thus, we lose
Distinctions that are plain and few:
These find I graven on my heart
That tells me what to do.

“The creatures see of flood and field,
And those that travel on the wind!
With them no strife can last; they live
In peace, and peace of mind.

“For why? Because the good old rule
Suffices them, the simple plan
That they should take who have the power,
And they should keep who can.”

Then clear the weeds from off his grave,
And let us chaunt a passing stave
In honour of that outlaw brave.

quoted in Dorothy Wordsworth Journal 1803

The Journal quotes the whole poem which goes on in the same vein for a further twenty stanzas. It reminds one, especially here in Glen Gyle, of J.K.Stephen’s somewhat pointed apostrophe to Wordsworth:

Two voices are there; one is of the deep
The other is of an old half-witted sheep

The space which it might have taken up by the whole of Wordsworth’s poem can be devoted to a finer poem by a lesser poet which appeared in a Book of Highland Verse in 1912:

LAMENT FOR ROB ROY

The setting sun will rise tomorrow
The earth will spring from Winter’s sorrow
The waining moon renewed is ever
But man from death returneth never

No more, no more, no more, no never
Returns unto us the brave MacGregor
Nor sword, nor gold, death’s bed can sever
MacGregor is gone: he’s gone forever

The breeze on the Ben is mourning and moaning,
The trees in the glen are grieving and groaning:
Oh sad runs the stream and rueful the river –
MacGregor is gone; for ever, for ever

No more, no more, no more, no never
Returns unto us the brave MacGregor
Nor sword, nor gold, death’s bed can sever
MacGregor is gone: he’s gone forever

Never more, by the shore, on the strath, or the mountain,
Will his call sweetly fall on the ears of Clan Alpine
Nor again in the glen will his eagle-plumes quiver –
The MacGregor is gone – to return, ah! never

No more, no more, no more, no never
Returns unto us the brave MacGregor
Nor sword, nor gold, death’s bed can sever
MacGregor is gone: he’s gone forever

Thro’ the heart of Ben Lomond the cumha is winging,
Thro’ Glen Gyle the weird wail of the banshee is ringing;
In the clouds with his fathers he’s dwelling forever –
The MacGregor is gone – to return never, never.

No more, no more, no more, no never
Returns unto us the brave MacGregor
Nor sword, nor gold, death’s bed can sever
MacGregor is gone: he’s gone forever

A.S.MacBride (1843-1923)

 

Sites Connected With Rob Roy in the National Park and Elsewhere

Inversnaid is the heart of the Rob Roy Country. Many writers allude to him, but it is often not clear whether it is the fictional character created by
Sir Walter Scott or the real person, or, sometimes, a legendary figure . Sites associated with Rob Roy in the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park are asterisked .

Aberuchill Castle – was never a McGregor-owned building, but for many years there was an oak tree by the main entrance known locally as “Rob Roy’s tree.” The story went that Rob Roy was on one occasion “detained” by Campbell of Aberuchill in a main room on the first floor. Rob noticed, however, that a sufficiently thick branch of the tree came close enough to the window for him to jump across and make good his escape. Legendary

Arnprior – Village; site of incident involving RR and Cunningham of Boquhan towhom RR yielded as the better swordsman. Historical [NS 6194]

*Auchinchisallen see Coirechaorach

*Bailie’s Rock – Cliff above the Loch Ard road (B829), also known as Echo Rock, where Scott set the incident in which Bailie Nichol Jarvie was suspended by his
braces during the skirmish between Helen MacGregor’s band, and Captain Thornton’s troops in ‘Rob Roy’ Fictional [NN 481 016]

*Bailie Nichol Jarvie Hotel – Hotel, built about 1850, in Aberfoyle near the Brig o’ Forth (i.e. some distance from the place where Scott placed Jean MacAlpine’s Inn) Fictional [NN 520 010]

*Bailie Nichol Jarvie’s Poker – Iron bar, supposed to be a coulter, attached to the old tree opposite the Hotel. Fictional

*Pass of Balmaha – Loch Lomond; one of several low passes leading into the Highlands, in this instance to Craig Royston Historical  [NS 418 910]

*Balquidder Kirk – The old kirk, in the grounds of the modern church, is the site of Rob Roy’s Grave Historical [NN 536 208]

*Bealach nam Bo – Pass, on Ben Venue above Loch Katrine; route by which RR might have taken stolen cattle Historical  [NN 480 075]

*Cambusmore – Country house, near Callander; Scott stayed there with J.M.Buchanan,while he was writing about the Trossachs; Bonnie Prince Charlie stayed there. Literary [NN 642 062]

Carbeth Inn – Inn; a ‘halfway house’ between Glasgow and Aberfoyle on the Stockiemuir Road; part of present building dates from 1816, but Scott describes it in ‘Rob Roy’ as a ‘most miserable alehouse’; however, he praised the bar lunch which they had, ‘some broiled moor-game, a dish which gallantly eked out the ewe’s milk cheese, dried salmon, and oaten bread…’ Fictional [NS 525 780]

Chapelarroch – Site of ale house, on Kelty Burn, Gartmore; scene of kidnap of Graham of Killearn, the Duke of Montrose’s factor. [NS 517 958]

*Coirechaorach – Site of house (Auchinchisallen) in Glen Dochart occupied by RR after his eviction from Craig Royston by Montrose; he was under the protection of the Earl of Breadalbane there; referred to as ‘Rob Roy’s Castle’ on old
maps. Historical   [NN 4527]

*Corriearklet – Township, between Glen Gyle and Inversnaid, ancestral home of Helen MacGregor’s family; a gun belonging to RR used to be displayed there. Historical [NN 376 096]

*Comer – Farm, under Ben Lomond; birthplace of RR’s wife, Mary (called Helen by Scott) Historical [NN 387 040]

*Craig Royston – Estate, centred on Cailness, Loch Lomond; officially owned by RR Historical [NN 3406]

Doune – Village; scene of incident in which James Edmonstone threatened to break RR’s neck, and RR withdrew Historical [NN 7201]

*Echo Rock – an alternative name for the Bailie’s Rock (qv) Fictional

*Factor’s Island – Eilean Dearg [Red Island] in Loch Katrine, off Stronachlachar, where RR held Graham of Killearn, the Duke of Montrose’s factor (steward) captive in 1697 [?] Historical [NN 4010]

*Falls of Falloch – Waterfalls in Glen Falloch; the plunge pool is called ‘Rob Roy’s Bathtub’ and a small cleft above it ‘Rob Roy’s Soapdish’ Legendary [NN 338 207]

Fords of Frew – Fords, at Brig o’Frew; crossed the Forth near Kippen, forming the only realistic alternative to Stirling Bridge; used by drovers; used by Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1745; scene of escape by RR fictionalised by Scott. Historical [NS 667 961]

Garden – House at Arnprior; sometimes called Garden Castle; site of incident in 1710 when RR took possession while Stirling of Garden was away; he held their baby out of the window before they complied with his request for blackmail Historical
[NS 597 945]

*Glen Gyle – Farm, at Loch Katrine; RR’s birthplace. Historical [NN 386 135]

*Helen’s Rock – Cliff, above Loch Ard where Helen MacGregor forced the spy, Dougal, into the loch to drown. Fictional [NN 484 014]

*Inchcailleach – Island in Loch Lomond; graveyard of the Clan MacGregor; RR’sancestors are buried there. Historical [NS 4090]

*Inallian Ford – Ford, hard under Doon Hill, Aberfoyle; where Scott set RR’s escape, based on a historical incident which took place at the Fords of Frew. Fictional [NN 537 004]

This scene is situated but a short distance from Aberfoyle, and is admirably suited for such an adventurous escape as Rob Roy is described to have achieved in the passage of the river. Both above and below the shallower passage which is used as a ford, the river winds in deep eddies under steep banks of clay, which the water has scooped into many obscure hollows, oveshaded by a thick tangling of uderwood, so as to be quite safe from the approach of cavalry.
James Skene (1775-1864)

*Inverlochlarig – Farm; site of RR’s last house where he died in 1734. Historical [NN 438 181]

*Inversnaid – Township, above Falls at Loch Lomond; part of Craig Royston Estate(qv); owned by RR, then the site of the Garrison built to contain the Macgregors after the 1715; stormed by RR’s clansmen in 1745 Historical [NN 348 096]

*Jean MacApine’s Inn – Former ale-house, now in ruins, at Milton-of-Aberfoyle, where Scott set the “Fray at the Clachan” a skirmish between a party of sassenachs and some highlanders in ‘Rob Roy’. Fictional [NN 502 014]

Kippen – Village; scene of ‘The Hership (Raid) of Kippen in 1691. Historical [NS 6594]

*Falls of Ledard – Waterfalls at Lochard; where Helen MacGregor made her alfresco farewell to Bailie Nichol Jarvie and Frank Osbaldistone in ‘Rob Roy’. Fictional [NN 460 026]

*MacGregor’s Leap – Name, used between the wars, for a waterfall at Aberfoyle; now called the Waterfall of the Little Fawn Legendary [NN 521 020]

*Monachyle Tuarach – Farm; occupied by RR as a young man, later possessed by RR’s nephew; where he took refuge after escaping from Duke of Atholl Historical [NN 476 190]

*Portnellan – Farm, at head of Loch Katrine, near Glen Gyle; the farm RR occupied after he was married. Historical [NN 402 123]

Queens View, Auchineden – Viewpoint; so-named from Queen Alexandra; almost certainly the viewpoint Scott had in mind for Frank Osbaldistone’s first view of the Highlands in ‘Rob Roy’ Fictional [NS 510 808]

The only exercise which my imagination received was, when some particular turn of the road gave us a partial view, to the left, of a large assemblage of dark-blue mountains stretching to the north and north west, which promised to include within their recesses, a country as wild perhaps, but certainly differing greatly in point of interest, from that which we now travelled.

*”Rob Roy” – Former steamer on Loch Katrine; the MacGregor’s motto ‘S’rioghail mo dhream’ [royal is my clan] was carved round the wheel. Succeeded in 1900 by the “Sir Walter Scott”, the present vessel.

*Rob Roy’s Bath Tub see Falls of Falloch

*’Rob Roy’s Burying Place’ – Graveyard on the shores of Loch Katrine mistakenly supposed by Wordsworth to be RR’s grave. Legendary [NN 4012]

*Rob Roy’s Castle see Coirechaorach

*Rob Roy’s Cave (1) – Rocks (sheltering beds) on Loch Lomond above Inversnaid on the West Highland Way; supposed hiding place of RR. Legendary [NN 332 100]

*Rob Roy’s Cave (2) – Rocks (sheltering beds) on Loch Ard, opposite Echo rock(qv); supposed hiding place of RR. Legendary [NN 480 014]
*Rob Roy’s Cave (3) – Cave on the Tulloch Burn behind a waterfall which commands a fine view of Loch Voil supposedly used as a hiding place by RR. Legendary [NN 516 213]

Rob Roy’s Grave see Balquhidder Kirk

Rob Roy’s Hole – Deep pothole on the Machar Burn in Campsie Hills Legendary [NS 5484]

Rob Roy’s House(1) see Portnellan

Rob Roy’s House(2) see Coirechaorach

Rob Roy’s House(3) – Site in Glen Shira where RR built a house under the protection of the Duke of Argyle Historical [NN 150 169]

Rob Roy’s House(4) see Inverlochlarig

*Rob Roy’s House (5) – house in Glendhu associated with Rob Roy (exact location uncertain) [NN 403 035]

*Rob Roy’s Leap – Spot on the Kelty, near Keltie Bridge [NS 534 963], where RR is said to have leapt 22′ (6.7 metres) Legendary

*Rob Roy Motel – Aberfoyle; first such in Scotland; a kitch monument to the folk hero [NN 531 002]

*Rob Roy’s Prison (1) see Factor’s Island

*Rob Roy’s Prison (2) – Cliff near Rowcoish, Loch Lomond where RR held the Sheriff Substitute of Dumbarton, Graham of Killearn, and other prisoners for
ransom; seen from A82 Historical [NS 3402]

Rob Roy’s Putting Stone (1) – Erratic boulder between Tyndrum and Bridge of Orchy Legendary [NN 3332]

*Rob Roy’s Putting Stone (2) – Erratic boulder at the head of the Kirkton Glen,
Balquhidder. Legendary [NN 5124]

Rob Roy’s Soapdish see Falls of Falloch

*Rob Roy’s Spring – Spring in the Duke’s Pass, under Craig Vadh; Cunningham Graham asserted that the true spring was nearer the Quarries. Legendary [NN 516 034]

Rob Roy’s Statue – Statue by Benno Schotz, Queen’s Sculptor in Ordinary; erected in 1975 in Stirling under the Castle crag. [NS 794 933]

*Rob Roy’s Stepping Stones – Crossing place on the Duchary at Duchary Castle, accessible from Loch Ard Forest Legendary [NS 478 999]

Rob Roy’s Tree – Tree, situated at Strathblane, otherwise called the Muckle Oak, or the ‘Meikle Tree’ was at the side of the
road at Blairquhosh near the distillery. It is now a stump.  Sometimes known as Rob Roy’s tree Legendary [NS 5282]

*Rob Roy Tryst – Exhibition centre and shop at Kingshouse, Balquhidder [NN 565 203]

*Rob Roy Visitor Centre – Tourist Board interpretive centre, in Callander, opened in 1990. [NN 628 079]

*Rob Roy’s Well – Spring, near Loch Chon Legendary [NN 431 043]

*Ross Priory – Country House at the foot of Loch Lomond; here Scott completed ‘Rob Roy’ in 1817 Literary [NS 412 876]

Sheriffmuir – Battlefield; site, above Dunblane, of an indecisive battle in the
1715 Jacobite Rising, in which RR took part. Historical [NN 8303]

Before leaving Stronachlachar a visit should be paid to Royal Cottage, Culligart which was deemed to be the most suitable place for drawing the water from Loch Katrine into the aqueduct which takes it to Glasgow. The construction involved in the Glasgow Corporation Waterworks Scheme was the occasion for a good deal of ceremony. The scheme was begun with a ceremony on the ridge between Loch Katrine and Loch Chon in May, 1856, and, remarkably enough, finished in 1859.

Royal Cottage, Loch Katrine

Royal Cottage, Loch Katrine

 

The scheme was declared open by the Queen and the Prince Consort, who arrived via Callander, in October of that year. Details were given in the local papers of the various routes by which dignatories would arrive at the remote spot chosen for the opening. One of these routes was, of course, from Stirling via Aberfoyle and Loch Ard. ‘Royal Cottage’ was refurbished for the occasion, and to look at it, one might suppose that the party were to stay for at least a week. In fact they had lunch there. The weather was appalling with thick mist and heavy rain. There was a predictably pompous address from the bailies of Glasgow, and the Queen responded in a simpler fashion, saying, in effect, that she was pleased to be associated with any scheme to reduce the number of her subjects who were unwashed. The proceedings concluded with, as the Stirling Journal put it, ‘a long prayer’ from the local minister. It was not until 1869 that Queen Victoria saw Loch Katrine under favourable conditions.

The engineer, J.F.Bateman (1810-1889), gave, at a banquet given in his honour, an eloquent account of the works which, at the time, were the most considerable of their kind in the world. It is still well worth walking the first part of the ‘Pipe Track Road’ in order to see the achievements of these Victorian engineers who built fine stone aqueducts in the heart of an inhospitable countryside:

It is impossible to convey to those who have not personnally inspected it, an impression of the intricacy of the wild and beautiful district through which the aqueduct passes for the first ten or eleven miles after leaving Loch Katrine. After finding the narrowest point at which the ridge between Loch Katrine and Loch Chon could be pierced, the country consists of successive ridges of the most obdurate rock, separated by deep wild valleys, in which it was very difficult, in the first instsance to find a way. There were no roads, no houses, no building materials – nothing which would ordinarily be considered essential to the successful completion of sa great engineering work for the conveyance of water; but it was consideration of the geological character of the material which gave all the romantic wildness to the district at once determined me to adopt that mode of construction which has been so successfully carried out. For the first ten miles the rock consists of mica schist and clay slate – close, retentive material into which no water percolates, and in which, in consequence, few springs are to be found. This rock when quarried was unfit for building purposes: there was no stone of a suitable description to be had at any reasonable cost or distance, no lime for mortar, no clay for puddle, and no roads to convey the material. Ordinary surface water construction was therefore out of the question; but I saw that if tunnelling were boldly resorted to, there would be no difficulty, beyond the cost and time required in blasting the rocks, in making a perfectly watertight and all-enduring aqueduct; there would be no water to hamper and delay us in the shafts and tunnels, and little would require transporting to the country but gunpowder and drill iron. This course was therefore determined upon, and my expectations have been realised to the very letter. The aqueduct may be considered as one continuous tunnel. as long as the work continued in the primary geological measures, we had no water; and even after it entered old red sandstone, and where it subsequently passed through trap rock, there was much less than I expected; so that our progress at no part of the work was very materially interfered with by those incidents which usually render mining operations costly and uncertain.

The scheme was expanded by raising the level of Loch Katrine, by providing a second pipeline, and by including Loch Arklet in the scheme between 1885 and 1914, and after the Second World War, by including Glen Finglas. What is remarkable is that, in spite of the changes, which involved the submerging of ‘the Silver Strand’, for example, the landscape which attracted the Wordsworths and Scott has been preserved rather than spoiled, and continues to attract people from all over the world. The ‘all-enduring’ nature of the project can be confirmed; the impressive aqueducts in the Loch Ard forest appear to be as sound today as they must have seemed to the self-confident Victorian engineers.

 

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